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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1820/4968
Title: Physical activity before school, including active commuting to school: associations with cognition and academic achievement in adolescents
Authors: Van Dijk, Martin
De Groot, Renate
Van Acker, Frederik
Savelberg, Hans
Kirschner, Paul A.
Keywords: Adolescents
Active Commuting
Physical activity
Cognition
Academic Achievement
Issue Date: 6-Jun-2013
Abstract: Active Commuting to School (ACS) may improve cognition and academic achievement in adolescents by two mechanisms. First, ACS may contribute to overall physical activity levels, which is positively associated with cognition / academic achievement in children and older adults. Second, an acute bout of exercise (ACS = an acute bout of exercise immediately before the start of the school) may immediately increase cognition and academic achievement in children. Thus far, only one study investigated the association between ACS and cognition in adolescents and found a positive association in girls3, corrected for extracurricular physical activity. However, ACS was based on self-report, which has several limitations, such as recall bias and social desirability. In addition, nothing is known yet about the association between ACS and academic achievement in adolescents. Therefore, associations between objectively measured active commuting to school and cognition / academic achievement in adolescents were investigated in this study.
Description: Van Dijk, M. L., De Groot, R. H. M., Van Acker, F. H. M., Savelberg, H. C. M., & Kirschner, P. A. (2013, 25 May). Physical activity before school, including active commuting to school: associations with cognition and academic achievement in adolescents. Poster presentation at the ISBNPA conference 2013, Ghent, Belgium.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1820/4968
Appears in Collections:1. LC: Publications and Preprints

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