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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1820/7392
Title: Teacher perspectives on whole-task information literacy instruction
Authors: Wopereis, Iwan
Frerejean, Jimmy
Brand-Gruwel, Saskia
Keywords: instructional design
information problem solving
information literacy
whole task models
4C/ID-model
university teachers
teacher perspectives
Issue Date: 13-Oct-2016
Citation: Wopereis, I., Frerejean, J., & Brand-Gruwel, S. (2016, October). Teacher perspectives on whole-task information literacy instruction. Paper presented at the fourth European Conference on Information Literacy (ECIL), Prague, Czech Republic.
Abstract: This paper presents results of an explorative study on perceived merits of contemporary holistic approaches to designing information literacy instruction in a university setting. Seven teachers in educational sciences evaluated their premaster’s course on conducting a literature review designed according to a modern design approach, named Four-Component Instructional Design (4C/ID). They noted their perceptions on course quality by means of a standardized course evaluation questionnaire and a SWOT analysis. Results of the questionnaire showed that teachers were positive on whole-task information literacy instruction, confirming the results of an earlier study on 4C/ID-caused instructional effects. The SWOT analysis indicated that teachers recognized the value of applied 4C/ID principles like whole-task-centeredness, structured guidance, and scaffolding. We added suggestions on enhancing the positive effects of whole-task instructional design based on identified educational weaknesses such as relatively poor constructive alignment and threats such as imperfect curriculum coherence.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1820/7392
Appears in Collections:1. FEEEL Publications, books and conference papers

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