Open Universiteit

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1820/8519
Title: "I care therefore I resist." How organisational citizenship behaviour is related to resistance to change.
Authors: Bruin, Esther de-Kusters
Issue Date: 15-Sep-2017
Publisher: Open Universiteit Nederland
Abstract: Change within organisations is a continuous process. Behavioural issues like resistance to change can make or break a change. This research wants to contribute to the knowledge of the relationship between organisational citizenship behaviour and resistance to change. Organisational citizenship behaviour consists of two variables: behaviour towards individuals and behaviour towards the organisation. Resistance to Change can be split into four variables: routine seeking, emotional reaction, short-term thinking and cognitive rigidity. Research shows that organisational citizenship behaviour can be both positively and negatively related to resistance to change. But the research was always conducted a. with a third variable, or b. with organisational citizenship behaviour or resistance to change as the moderating variable. This research focuses specifically on the relation between organisational citizenship behaviour and resistance to change. Research question: “How is organisational citizenship behaviour related to resistance to change?” This research was conducted with data from a questionnaire completed by 89 respondents. Besides items to measure organisational citizenship behaviour and resistance to change, also items concerning gender, age, sector, size of the organisation and length of employment were answered. The hypothesis to be tested was: Respondents with a higher score on the scale of organisational citizenship behaviour will show a high resistance to change. With a Pearson correlation (r) of -002 there is no significant correlation between organisational citizenship behaviour and resistance to change. The hypothesis is not supported. Performing the correlation analysis with the data organised by groups (gender, age, sector, size of organisation, and length of employment) still shows no significant correlation, but does give some interesting results. Female respondents show a possible negative relation, male respondents a possible positive relation. There is a possible difference in age and length of employment, as well as size of the organisation. When the analysis is conducted with variables that are part of organisational citizenship behaviour or resistance to change (e.g. organisational citizenship behaviour towards individuals and resistance to change – routine seeking), it shows a possible positive relation between organisational citizenship behaviour towards individuals and all parts of resistance to change. The analysis between organisational citizenship behaviour towards the organisation and all parts of resistance to change (except resistance to change – cognitive rigidity) shows a possible negative relation. Unfortunately the research has a low validity and reliability due to the missing context in the nature of the research. Respondents can have a different mind-set while filling in the questionnaire (selection bias). Furthermore it seems the relationship between organisational citizenship and resistance to change is too complex to address with a quantitative approach. Further and qualitative research can contribute to understanding the differences and broaden the knowledge of organisational citizenship behaviour and resistance to change. This research should focus specifically on respondents influenced by the same organisational change, so selection bias is avoided.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1820/8519
Appears in Collections:MSc Management Science

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