Open Universiteit

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1820/8782
Title: Sensor-based learning support
Authors: Schneider, Jan
Keywords: Sensors
Feedback
Public-Speaking
Tutor Systems
Doctoral thesis
Issue Date: 24-Nov-2017
Citation: Schneider, J. (2017, 24 november). Sensor-based learning support. (Doctoral dissertation). Open Universiteit, Heerlen, the Netherlands.
Series/Report no.: SIKS Dissertation Series No.;2017-46
Abstract: In recent years sensor devices have become increasingly popular. Everyday objects which previously seemed to be unanimated, are turning into smart devices with the capability to sense the environment, integrate and present digital information and services for nearly every situation and context. The research in this dissertation starts with a study of the state-of-the-art about the use of sensors to support the learning process. To contribute to the state-of-the-art, sensor-based prototypes designed to support the development of public speaking skills were developed and evaluated following a design-based research approach. This approach consisted of three iterations. The first iteration includes a study on how to effectively provide feedback to learners, and a study exploring the effects of this feedback. The studies conducted during the second iteration explore how the developed prototypes can support learners in giving better presentations to human audiences. Finally, studies of the third iteration investigate how sensor-based prototypes can be used to support self-reflection for public speaking, help learners to acquire a powerful emotional state before giving a presentation, and explore the reception of these prototypes by secondary school students following a course on presentations.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1820/8782
ISBN: 9789461597694
Appears in Collections:PhD Welten Institute

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