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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1820/9315
Title: The interplay between attitude consistency and source credibility in web page evaluation: First insights from single-document reading
Authors: Kammerer, Yvonne
Keywords: attitudes
Internet
online reading
source evaluation
source credibility
Issue Date: Oct-2017
Citation: Kammerer, Y. (2017, October). The interplay between attitude consistency and source credibility in web page evaluation: First insights from single-document reading. Annual Workshop on Multiple Documents Comprehension. Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien, Tübingen, Germany.
Abstract: Individuals often devalue information that is inconsistent with their preexisting attitudes. To date, however, little is known about how that interacts with source credibility. According to Knobloch-Westerwick et al. (2015), the devaluation of attitude-inconsistent information “should be less pronounced for messages coming from low-credibility sources, because they are easily refuted and thus less challenging to preexisting attitudes” (p. 174). To test this assumption, in the present study 44 university students (M = 22.66 years, SD = 2.67; 70.5% female) were presented a webpage to learn about the effectiveness of a fictitious nutritional supplement. The webpage argued for an intake of the supplement. Prior to reading, participants’ attitudes towards the intake of nutritional supplements (from “1 = very negative” to “5 = very positive”) were assessed with three five-point Likert items (Cronbach’s alpha = .77). Source credibility was experimentally varied between participants: the webpage was either neutral and independent or commercially biased (as could be read in an “about us” section below the text). During reading, eye movements were recorded. After reading, participants had to provide ratings on argument convincingness and source trustworthiness (5-point Likert scales). Results showed an interaction between attitudes and source credibility for argument convincingness and source trustworthiness ratings (p = .011 and p = .032) as well as for the time spent reading the webpage text (p = .013). In line with the assumption by Knobloch-Westerwick et al. (2015) attitudes were only positively related to both the convincingness and the trustworthiness rating, when the webpage was neutral (β =.535, p = .002, and β =.484, p = .008), but not when it was commercially-biased (β =-.236, p = .328, and β =-.159, p = .533). Moreover, in the latter case attitudes were negatively related to the time spent reading the text (β =-.731, p = .006), but not in the former (β =.068, p = .699). Contrary to the “extended” D-ISC assumption (Braasch, & Bråten, 2017), attitudes, however, were not significantly related to the time spent on the ”about us” section (i.e., the source information).
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1820/9315
Appears in Collections:2. FEEEL Presentations at conferences and events

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